Informational Guide

Can Banana Peels Go In A Garbage Disposal?

Can banana peels go in the garbage disposal? Read this review to find out more!

by Ian Haynes

Garbage disposals are useful tools in keeping your home tidy and clean. However, some items should never go to your disposal. Can banana peels go in the garbage disposal? Read this review to find out if they can and what to do if one gets into your garbage disposal pipes.

Because they are so fibrous, banana peels should never be put down the garbage disposal. Banana peels are naturally tough to protect the soft fruit inside and take a decent battering before being destroyed. When cut, the fibers can get tangled around the blades, stuck in the pipes, or wear down in the most stringent disposal system and reducing its lifespan.

If you do put banana peels in garbage disposals, you can face issues such as a slow drain, dull blades, or a clogged system. While tougher disposals advertise that they can handle things like banana peels, this should be a rare occurrence rather than an everyday habit.

banana peal

What to Do When Banana Peels Get Stuck in a Garbage Disposal

Remove the clog

  • Switch off the garbage disposal.
  • Pull out any peels you see with tongs.
  • Run cold water through the disposal for a few minutes.
  • If the disposal is jammed, we recommend either resetting your system according to manual instructions or loosening the grinder plate to release the jam.
  • Put it all back together without over-tightening the bolts to avoid cracking.

Clean the trap

  • Turn the garbage disposal off completely.
  • Place a bucket underneath the trap and remove it altogether, carefully following manual instructions.
  • Rinse the trap carefully to remove food or debris and replace it. Do not over-tighten the screws.
  • Turn your disposal on and run cold water through the system for a few minutes.

Clear the pipe clog

There are plenty of ways to clear a pipe clog. We recommend using a plunger or a drain snake first. If these methods are unsuccessful, you could try various home remedies online. If that is ineffective, try using a standard drain cleaner. Do not use a commercial cleaner before trying these methods as that can cause damage to your garbage disposal.


How Should You Dispose Of Banana Peels?

Use in Compost

Banana peels are rich in nitrogen and other nutrients, making them an excellent green material to mix with other foods for fertilizer.

Feed Animals

If you have local animals that can digest bananas, rinse the banana carefully to remove pesticides before mashing it up and leaving it outside.

Eat it

Banana peels can be used as a meat replacement in vegan cooking. Try replacing pulled pork with a banana peel for family food night.

Put it in a trash bin

If none of the above options work for you, put the banana peel in the correct waste bin.

banana

How to Properly Use A Garbage Disposal

Use Cold Water

Running water helps to flush food waste from your system. Using cold water specifically helps solidify any fat and make it easier for your blades to break it down.

Use it Regularly

Use your garbage disposal regularly to prevent rusting, seizing, rotting, or food buildup. Lack of use can also create foul smells, which can be off-putting while cooking.

Disinfect and Clean

Follow our guide here to learn how to deep clean a garbage disposal.


People also Ask (FAQs)

What other common items should not be put down a garbage disposal?

There are plenty of foods that should never go into a garbage disposal, including:

  • Fat or grease
  • Pasta, rice, or oats
  • Bones
  • Seafood shells
  • Fibrous fruits and vegetables
  • Potato peels
  • Glass and metal
  • Eggshells
  • Coffee grounds
  • Nuts
How long does it take banana peel to decompose?

A banana peel can take up to two years to decompose; because of this, we recommend composting it rather than dumping your banana peel on the sidewalk.


Conclusion

Can banana peels be put in the garbage disposal? No, they cannot. We recommend disposing of your banana peels another way, such as via composting or the waste bin.

Ian Haynes is an expert writer who has successfully deployed over 500 plumbing pages and other related content. He has an excellent understanding of home plumbing issues and translates his experiences via Plumbing Lab so readers can have a better understanding of common household problems. Outside of his work, Ian likes exploring Brooklyn with his Labrador.

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