Buyer's Guide & Information

Best Whole House Water Filters Reviewed

These brands remove chemicals and offer reliable filtration for clean drinking water.

by PlumberAndy

Buyer's Guide & Information

Best Whole House Water Filters Reviewed

These brands remove chemicals and offer reliable filtration for clean drinking water.

by PlumberAndy

by PlumberAndy

There are many different types of filters for the water that enters your home. Stand-alone filters that attach to your faucets, also known as Point-of-Use, or POU filters, are convenient but can become expensive when you have to connect them to every tap.

Instead of wasting your money on that many fixtures, filters, and replacement parts, you can instead purchase a whole house filter. This article will examine the best whole house water filters to help you determine the best option for you.

Preview

Product

Filter Micron Rating

Capacity

Check Price

Aquasana Whole House Water Filter System w/...

Aquasana EQ-1000

15 Microns

1 Million Gallons

APEC 3-Stage Whole House Water Filter System...

APEC Water Systems 3-Stage

25 Microns

80,000 Gallons

Express Water Heavy Metal Whole House Water...

Express Water Heavy Metal

5 Microns

100,000 Gallons

Express Water Whole House Water Filter, 3...

Express Water WH300SCGS

5 Microns

100,000 Gallons

iSpring WGB21B 2-Stage Heavy Duty Whole House...

iSpring WGB21B

5 Microns

50,000 Gallons

iSpring WGB32B 3-Stage Whole House Water...

iSpring WGB32B

5 Microns

100,000 Gallons

Whirlpool WHESFC Pro Series –...

Whirlpool WHESFC Pro Series

5 Microns

100,000 Gallons

Home Master Whole House Three Stage Water...

Home Master HMF3SDGFEC

1 Micron

95,000 Gallons

APEC Water Systems WH-SOLUTION-15 Whole House...

APEC Water Systems

1 Micron

100,000 Gallons

Whole House Water Filter System (4-6...

1Pelican Water Systems

5 Micron

100,000 Gallons


How Whole House Water Filters Work

A whole house filter, unlike a POU filter, is a single unit installed directly on the water lines that feed your entire home. This means it is attached to the water supply before getting to your home’s piping. This way, water is filtered for every aspect of your home. Sinks, tubs, toilets, garden hoses, even the water heater; they all receive the filtered water.

The filters will collect most contaminates that can cause bad tasting water, pose an environmental threat, or even make you ill. The level of filtration and types of filtered contaminants will vary from vendor, brand, and filter. However, for the most part, you can expect your home water to be a much safer level for all water-based activities.


Types Of Water Contaminants

It is common knowledge to those looking to install a whole house water filter, that the more filtration stages you have, the better your water will be. But what, exactly, do those stages filter out? Let’s have a look.

  • Physical Contaminants
    Physical contaminants are things that occur naturally in nature and get into our water through various means like leeching, soil compounds, and broken or cracked water lines. These include organic material and sediment such as sand, dirt, run-off, etc.Most of these contaminants are harmless to ingest in small amounts, such as that which comes from your tap. However, they can cause foul odors and bad taste to your water — definitely, nothing you want to fill a glass with or brush your teeth in.
  • Chemical Contaminants
    Chemical contaminants are things that occur naturally or are man-made. These seep into our water supply through various means and can be harmful to drink, bathe in, or absorb. The most dangerous examples are called Volatile Organic Compounds, or VOCs.VOCs are made from burning organic materials like wood, coal, and cigarettes. VOCs also generally have scientific names that are difficult to pronounce. Other chemical examples are things like chlorine, salt, fluoride, solvent toxins, and chloramine.
  • Biological Contaminants
    Biological contaminants might be the most feared type of water contaminates. They are living organisms that make their way into our tap water. This can include such things as viruses, microbes, bacteria, and parasites.Most of the water treatment plants filter for these items on their level, but that doesn’t mean everything is captured or prevented from introduction before it gets to your home.
  • Radiological Contaminants
    Radiological contaminants are simply chemical elements that have a radioactive property. Because the elements have more protons than neutrons, they can emit what is known as ionizing radiation. The most familiar radiological contaminant is lead.Other elements include plutonium, cesium, and uranium. While it is rare to have supplied water with these elements in them reach your home, backwoods water, and well water are more susceptible.

Buying Guide: Whole House Water Filters

There are certain aspects to whole house filters that you should consider before you pull out your wallet and tap that buy button. Let’s look at a few of the major considerations now.

Water Issues/ Water Quality

Examining your current situation is crucial. You will need to figure out how much water you use that needs to be filtered, the type of water you have (hard water will filter differently than soft water), and other factors.

It will also help to determine what is actually in your water that requires filtration. If you purchase a water testing kit, you will have a better idea of which filter systems you need based on the contaminants in your water.

Water Consumption

You should also understand that the more filtration sages you place between the water supply and the tap, the longer it will take for the water to reach you. Most 3 to 5-stage filters will have a flow rate between 8 and 12 gallons per minute.

The level of filtration involved also determines the GPM flow rate. For example, filters that collect particles in the sub-micron level (0.2, 0.1, for example) will only have a flow rate of about one gallon per minute. While the water will be most pure and contaminate free, it isn’t enough water to take a shower with.

Type of Filter

Once you know how much water you need to filter and preserve, as well as what is actually in your water, you can better decide the type of filter you need. For instance, you don’t want to waste money on buying more expensive filters that reduce lead and cesium if there isn’t any trace of lead or cesium in your water. Match the contaminants in your water with the filter you purchase.

Filtration Capacity & Filter Life

Another thing to think about is the filter itself. Each filter has a capacity, or how much water can flow through it while being filtered. In most cases, the higher the capacity, the better for you. However, sometimes, a higher capacity can raise your water bill or cause flow problems further down the line.

You will also need to know the filter life expectancy. If you install the whole house water filter, it needs to be accessible so you can replace the filter cartridges as needed. Making this more difficult on yourself isn’t advised, even for aesthetic reasons.

Certifications

You will see a bunch of claims and certificates or award looking symbols on the packaging of these products. You need to be aware of what they mean. Certification for NSF or ANSI is a crucial factor in your filtration system. However, there is a huge difference in being NSF certified and “Tested to NSF standards.”

Meeting standards is fine, but being certified means that it was tested by the NSF and ANSI to comply with their rules and regulations.

Port/Connector Size

You will also want to make sure that your new whole house water filter fits your home piping. The port and connectors on the filter need to match the dimensions of your water inlet and outlet pipes. Sweat in, threaded, or Shark-Bite connectors may also need to be measured.

The last thing you want it to purchase a new filter system only to find out the model you want doesn’t work with your plumbing.

Price & Warranty

Finally, your budget will be a large determining factor. Staying within your budget is always a good idea. Not only for your peace of mind but to make sure you don’t regret your purchase down the road.

You should also check if the systems come with a warranty. If they do (and most do), you need to understand the terms of the warranty. For example, some may require professional installation for the warranty to be valid. You may also need to register the product upon purchase or maintain proof of purchase.

Knowing the terms and requirements will make a claim easier if you ever need to file one.


10 Best Whole House Water Filters Reviewed

Without further ado or fanfare, we offer you our reviewed and compared 10 best whole house water filter systems.

1. Aquasana EQ-1000

Our Top Pick

Filter Micron Rating

15 microns

Capacity

1 million Gallons

Contaminants Removed

Chlorine, Chloramine, lead, mercury, pesticides, herbicides, bacteria, virus, VOCs

Filtration Media

Biological, Chemical

Filter Life

1 - 3 Months

Warranty

10 years or 1 million gallons

The EQ-1000 series from Aquasana brings you a whole house filter system that does more than almost any other filter system on the market. Not only do you get filtered water, but the multiple-stages don’t reduce water flow. The entire system maintains a flow rate of 7 gallons per minute (GPM) using a unique up-flow directional filter.

The first step is a sediment prefilter. The water then passed through two up-flow canisters for sediment and water conditioning. The water softener doesn’t need salt added, either, making it maintenance-free. There is a UV starlight filter that helps kill bacteria, viruses, and chlorine that finalizes the filtration process before sending the water to your taps.

Installation can be a DIY project with the included pro installation kit. You also have a choice in filtration methods, with a total of five systems designed for city water, well water, and backwoods water. Finding the right Aquasana filter system for your needs is as simple as clicking the buy button.

Pros
  • Kills bacteria, virus and eliminates 97% of chlorine
  • UV filter included
  • Five set-up options for specific water filter needs
Cons
  • Does not reduce total dissolved solids (TDS)
  • Pro install kit not available with all options.
  • Filters should be replaced monthly to every 3 months, adding to the total cost.

2. APEC Water Systems 3-Stage

Best Whole House Iron Water Filter

Filter Micron Rating

25 microns

Capacity

80,000 Gallons

Contaminants Removed

Iron, Chlorine, Sediment

Filtration Media

Chemical

Filter Life

3 Months

Warranty

1 year limited warranty

APEC water systems give us a 3-stage filtration method that reduces odor, bad taste, sediments, and iron from your water. The simple to install system is 100% American made and ships in a single box.

The 20-inch 3-in-1 combination filter uses a sediment filter to remove organic impurities, an iron filter to remove iron, coloring, and bad taste from your tap water and a charcoal filter for any odors or other small particles.

You also have the option to purchase the 2-stage system or a system designed for heavy-metals removal. The Iron removal system listed here helps restore your city, well or backwoods water to cleaner, clearer better tasting water without a lot of fuss.

The filters screw into the system, so exchanging them for new ones every three months isn’t a problem. You will also maintain up to 10 GPM flow rate with the system installed so you won’t notice any pressure or flow rate loss when opening a tap.

Pros
  • Specifically designed to remove iron
  • Helps keep water clear and odor-free
  • 1-box install for the DIYer
Cons
  • Won't remove any other heavy metals
  • Doesn’t remove TDS

3. Express Water Heavy Metal

Best Rated

Filter Micron Rating

5 microns

Capacity

100,000 Gallons

Contaminants Removed

Sediment, Iron, Lead, Chloramine, Arsenic, Sulfur, Algae, Viruses, Hydrogen Sulfide, Fungi, Mercury, Chlorine, Aluminum, Chlorine, Pharmaceuticals, and Pesticides

Filtration Media

Biological, Chemical

Filter Life

3-6 months

Warranty

1-year limited warranty

Express Water has one of the easiest to install whole house water filter systems available. The entire unit can be installed in less than 2 hours, including water pipe cutting. Everything you need for cleaner, fresher tasting water is included.

The 3-stage filtration makes heavy metals disappear in your tap water and prevents discoloration and odors from building up in your system. With a flow rate of 15 GPM, you won’t notice any pressure loss at the tap, either.

Each stage of filtration is specifically designed to help your water be pure as possible when reaching the faucet. The first stage, sediment, captures particles down to 5 microns to reduce rust and organic materials.

The second stage, Kinetic Degradation Fluxion (KDF), uses a process called redox. This reduces the heavy metals found in your water. Finally, the third stage, carbon, reduces unwanted items in your water system, such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, chlorine, and focuses on removing any bad taste and odor.

The filters can process about 100,000 gallons of water and should last you upwards of about six months before needing to be changed out.

Pros
  • Long filter life
  • Simple installation process
  • Removes most heavy metals from tap water
Cons
  • Replacement filters must be exact matches
  • Parts, including filters, can be pricey

4. Express Water WH300SCGS

Best 3 Stage Whole House Water Filter

Filter Micron Rating

5 microns

Capacity

100,000 Gallons

Contaminants Removed

Sediment, Chlorine, Pharmaceuticals, and Pesticides

Filtration Media

Chemical

Filter Life

3-6 months

Warranty

1-year limited warranty

Express Water’s WH300SCGS is the exact system mentioned above, with a different filter set. You still get the stand-alone frame with gauges. Should you decide not to do a mounted install, this system, and the Express Water system above, will each operate efficiently in their frames without being permanently attached.

This system does not reduce heavy metals, instead focusing on removing sediments, organic materials, and pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and odor-causing organisms. If you have tested your water before purchase and don’t have any heavy metal contamination, then this is the Express Water system for you.

It also works well in conjunction with a POU filter at sink taps for even better-tasting water. The high flow rate allows you to shower, clean, cook, and wash dishes without a single drop in water pressure. There are also no batteries to replace or circuits to plug in. This system won’t even raise your water bill.

The downside to an Express Water whole house filter system is that each one is specially designed for a specific filter cartridge. You cannot swap cartridges for one another. Because of this, their cartridges are more expensive than a lot of the others on this list. However, they do last longer than the industry average, giving you up to 6 months of cleaner water.

Pros
  • Can be mounted or unmounted with the supplied frame.
  • Simple installation process for DIYers
  • Makes water clear, crisp and taste great
Cons
  • Does not remove heavy metals
  • Filters need to be exact matches for replacement
  • Filters are more expensive than most

5. iSpring WGB21B

Best Cheap Whole House Water Filter

Filter Micron Rating

5 microns

Capacity

50,000 Gallons

Contaminants Removed

Sediments, chlorine, chloramines, and chemicals

Filtration Media

Chemical

Filter Life

Up to 6 months

Warranty

1-year limited warranty

The iSpring system provides a 2-stage filter process that almost any DIYer can install themselves. The system is set up to retain TDS (reverse osmosis systems are available to remove TDS if you prefer); however, it will remove contaminants with the sediment filter.

The charcoal filter will also reduce chemicals that cause odors and bad tastes in your drinking water. This system works best with a POU system under the sinks where you need drinking water, such as the kitchen and bathroom.

Unlike more extensive systems, the iSpring will not reduce water consumption and produces up to 15 GPM output to keep your water pressure up and output high. The iSpring system is also designed to be added on with extra filters later if the need arises. You can purchase a UV filter to help control bacteria and viruses in the water, or a sediment prefilter to reduce even more organic compounds.

The filters themselves are simple to exchange, and each one will be able to filter up to 50,000 gallons. On an average use cycle, this is about five to six months of filtration.

Pros
  • Easy DIY installation following the provided detailed instructions.
  • Filters are easy to swap when the time comes.
Cons
  • Extra filters added on later need to be accounted for in the initial installation.
  • Works better when there are also POU filters installed.

6. iSpring WGB32B

Best Whole House Sediment Filter

Filter Micron Rating

5 microns

Capacity

100,000 Gallons

Contaminants Removed

Sediments, chlorine, chloramines, and chemicals

Filtration Media

Chemical

Filter Life

Up to 1 year

Warranty

1-year limited warranty

This 3-stage filter system from iSpring offers you even more filtered water protection from the model listed above. The only reason it is not listed higher in our review is that the 2-stage system is cheaper and filters the same types of contaminants.

This system is worthy in its own right, though, With two carbon filters instead of one for improved taste, color, and quality at the tap. Unlike the iSpring system above, this filter set up will work without the need for a POU filter at the tap.

As long as you don’t need to remove TDS or heavy metals, you can’t go wrong with the WGB32B model from iSpring. Installation is still simple and can accommodate extra filters such as the UV filter and sediment prefilter. You will need to plan ahead during the initial installation, though, if you plan to add these filters later.

Each filter maintains a 100,000-gallon capacity and will output up to 15 gallons per minute flow rate. The difference here is the filters are large and will last up to 12 months instead of 6. While you will need to purchase more filters, you will do so less often, saving you money in the long run.

Pros
  • 2 carbon filters reduce virtually all trace of bad odors and foul taste
  • Simple to install for the DIYer
  • UV and sediment prefilters are available for installation alongside the unit.
Cons
  • If you plan to add other filters, you need to account for their space before installing the main system.
  • Doesn’t filter anything different than the 2-stage system

7. Whirlpool WHESFC Pro Series

Best Whole House Filter For Hard Water

Filter Micron Rating

5 microns

Capacity

100,000 Gallons

Contaminants Removed

Iron, Chlorine Other Sediment, etc. Lead, Chlorine, Sediment, Calcium, Magnesium, Manganese, and Iron

Filtration Media

Mechanical

Filter Life

Lifetime

Warranty

1-year limited

Whirlpool is known for its durable, reliable, and high-quality products. It is no surprise that their whole house water filter system would be just as high quality and unique. The four-foot-tall self-contained system not only works well but looks good doing it.

Installation is simple and doesn’t require a lot of space. However, because the system does stand over four feet tall, you will need the room to do maintenance and check on the system’s operational controls.

This system is an all-in-one style system that filters the water and softens the water before it reaches your faucets. Unlike every other model on our review list so far, the Whirlpool filter is NSF certified (the others are built to NSF standards, but not officially certified).

While this is a water softener first, it is a reliable filter system, as well. It can reduce the hardness of the most stubborn water supplies with ease while maintaining odor, taste, and chlorine control.

Here is the best part; you never have to replace a filter cartridge. The system automatically flushes the filters and cleans them inside the housing every 14 days. Once you install the system, minimal maintenance is required, and salt levels need to be maintained. However, as far as filter replacement, that is a thing of the past.

Pros
  • Never replace a filter cartridge
  • Selectively uses salt on-demand to reduce consumption.
  • DIY install in less than 2 hours
Cons
  • 4 foot tall, 120-pound unit needs room for installation
  • High level of maintenance to ensure proper levels for softening and filtration.

8. Home Master HMF3SDGFEC

Best Whole House Filter For Well Water

Filter Micron Rating

1 micron

Capacity

95,000 Gallons

Contaminants Removed

iron, manganese, sediment, chemicals

Filtration Media

Chemical

Filter Life

6 months

Warranty

2-year warranty

Home Master has a whole house filter system designed for well water users. This system effectively reduces iron, manganese, and other harmful metals, as well as most chemicals and sediments or organic additives.

The filters are over-sized to reduce pressure drop and maintain a 15 GPM flow rate. Even when taking longer showers, you won’t notice a drop in water pressure. Drinking water is best served with a POU filter in addition to the well-water filter here. However, even without a POU filter, you will notice a reduction in colors, odors, and foul tastes commonly associated with well water consumption.

Because the filters are larger than most others, you can replace them less frequently. They do cost a bit more, though, so the total cost averages out. However, the maintenance is lower since you don’t have to check on the system as often.

Installation is straightforward, but it is recommended you have a professional installer put the system in. Because it is well water-specific, it is also best used with a POU filter for drinking water.

Pros
  • Designed specifically for well water systems
  • Reduces iron, sediments, and other harmful contaminants of well water.
  • Sediment filter maintains pressure and flow rate
Cons
  • Bigger filters are more expensive
  • Installation may be more difficult for the DIYer than others on this list.

9. APEC Water Systems

Best Whole House Water Filter/ Softener Combo

Filter Micron Rating

1 micron

Capacity

100,000 Gallons

Contaminants Removed

Iron, Chlorine Other Sediment, etc.

Filtration Media

Mechanical and Chemical

Filter Life

6 months

Warranty

2-year limited warranty

APEC water returns to our list with a filter system to rival the Whirlpool in terms of was of use and maintenance-free water delivery. This all-in-one system will remove sediments and contaminants while also softening hard water.

The two-tank system is maintenance-free, and once installed, you have little to do other than enjoy fresh, clean water in your home (up to six bathrooms). There are smaller options for smaller homes and an opportunity for only having a water softener. If you already have POU water filters, this may be an economical option for you.

Without POU filters, the all-in-one system will handle everything for you, including odor and taste improvements. Not only that, but included in the purchase is a 10-inch Big Blue sediment prefilter. Usually, this would add an additional $150 to your total and require a separate shipment. Now, though, you can get a single box delivered and have whole house water filters installed in no time.

The best part of this system, unlike the Whirlpool version, is that there is no salt needed. This not only helps reduce maintenance to virtually zero hours but maintains the filters and piping throughout the system.

Pros
  • Maintenance-free design
  • Easy installation even with the sediment prefilter included
  • No-salt system
Cons
  • Bigger pressure drop than other options on this review list.
  • Must be mounted for installation, even with large tanks.

10. Pelican Water Systems

Top Of The Range Filter System

Filter Micron Rating

5 micron

Capacity

100,000 Gallons

Contaminants Removed

Sediments, organic compounds, chlorine, and chloramine

Filtration Media

Mechanical

Filter Life

Months/years

Warranty

-

Pelican Water Systems is one of the best names in the industry. Their best continues to get better over time, as well. With the new water system, you can connect your water supply either inside the home or outside. The stainless steel tank stands almost 6-feet tall, which can make installation a nightmare if you have to reroute pipes.

It is recommended that you have a professional install the system for you; this will also maintain the warranty. It is for this reason the Pelican system is not higher on our list. Another downside is that the listed system does not filter iron, which is typical for well water and municipal water supplies.

There is a Pelican system for iron and manganese, though, but there are other downsides to that system that prevent it from making our top 10 list. The system shown here, though, is excellent at reducing chlorine, chloramine, and sediments. The Big Blue sediment prefilter will maintain 100,000 gallons of water, meaning you only need to change it out every 6 months.

The tanks also come with shut off valves to make filter swap simple. While the cost is high, the maintenance is low, and over time, the system will end up paying for itself.

Pros
  • Install inside or outside the home
  • Maintenance-free
  • Stand-alone system that does not need reverse osmosis or POU systems
Cons
  • Large, near 6-foot tank, may require piping re-routing
  • Installation should be handled by a professional.
  • Does not filter iron.

Whole House Water Filtration Methods

It is essential to distinguish between the various types of whole house water filters. Some will filter particles that others won't and vise versa. Knowing the contaminates, the different filter types are adept at collecting can make or break your purchase decision.

Carbon Adsorption

Carbon absorption filters use carbon, which has a large surface area and is quite porous. The water passes through the carbon, and the contaminates are attracted to it like a magnet. Carbon absorption is useful for water that has foul odors or a bad taste.

Sediment Filtration

Sediment filters are more or less a trap for free-floating particles in the water. This can be anything from sediment, organic material, or even corrosion from older piping. The water passes through the filter material, where these particles are trapped like an animal in a net.

Ion Exchange

Ion Exchange uses chemistry to trap particles that you want to be filtered out of the water. The trade-off is that new particles are introduced. For example, a positively charged ion resin will be coated in sodium. When the water passes over the resin, the positively charged calcium particles are bound to the resin, releasing some of the sodium particles. The effect then, is harsher chemicals are trapped while less obtrusive ones are added.

Catalytic Conversion

Catalytic carbon conversion changes the surface structure of activated carbon to remove chloramine from water systematically. It is also effective at reducing hydrogen sulfide from tap water, as well. Unlike activated carbon, catalytic carbon can be “rinsed off and reused,” to prolong filter life and aid in recycling.

Oxidation-Reduction

Oxidation-reduction is the best method to reduce heavy metals from water. It is a process where an oxidant is added to the water (through the filter media), which converts the dissolved particles to a more filterable solid, which is then captured by the filter material.

UV Sterilization

UV rays (like those from the sun) are known to kill water-based bacteria and viruses. The UV sterilization runs UV irradiation through the water to kill off harmful bacteria or virus organisms. It shouldn’t be used as a stand-alone filtration method, though, and works best with carbon or catalytic filter.


Whole House vs. Point of Use Water Filters

The two primary types of home water filtration are whole house filter systems and Point of Use (POU) systems. Depending on your specific needs, one isn’t necessarily better than the other.

Whole house filter systems are installed after the water meter and before the main entry into the home. This means that all of the water entering the house is filtered. While it may seem better to use this approach, there are some downsides. For example, charcoal filtration can remove chlorine, which helps prevent contamination of the water supply form corroded piping.

POU filter systems, on the other hand, need to be installed at every point where you want filtered water. This can be at every sink in the home, the refrigerator for the ice and water dispensers, the tub or showers. While being able to pin-point which taps have filtered water, it is a more expensive venture having to purchase a filtering system for each faucet.


Installing Whole House Water Filters

Before you tackle the job of installing a whole house water filter, you need to decide if it would be better to hire a professional for the job. While it can be a DIY project, your state, city, or county may require specific permits, especially since you will be cutting main water lines.

Home Advisor estimates the total cost of hiring a professional to be between $400 and $10,000. The national average, though, is a more moderate $1778.

If you do decide to take on the project yourself, the following steps will outline the majority of installations. Some will require electricity; others won’t requiring cutting water lines at all. You will need to refer to the installation manual of the system you purchase before beginning.

  • 1
    Shut off the main water supply. In most areas, this will need to be done by calling the water company and having them send out someone to turn it off and on for you.
  • 2
    Mark the insertion point of the filter on the copper piping and cut the pipe. Remove enough to allow the filter system to be installed. Remove any edges or burrs form the cut lines.
  • 3
    It is advised to install a shut-off valve here so that you can quickly turn the water off to replace the filter cartridges when it is time.
  • 4
    Mount the filter mounting bracket to the joist or wall at the installation point.
  • 5
    Following the instructions included with your unit, install the fittings on either side of the filter system and then dry-fit the filter in place. Use PTFE tape or compression nuts where needed, and avoid over-tightening.
  • 6
    If you are using copper or galvanized piping, your home may be using the underground pipes as grounding lines. If this is the case, you need to install grounding clips, and a ground wire lead around the filter system.
  • 7
    Return water pressure to your system, opening the main valve slowly until there is enough water flow to avoid blowing a fitting.

If you want a more visual representation of a basic installation, you can view this video:


Replacing a Whole House Water Filter

Replacing your filter cartridge is a crucial aspect of owning a whole house water filter system. As you can understand, as the filters collect the particles from your water, they will need to be replaced to continue working correctly.

Most systems will use a screw-on cartridge housing. You will have to turn off the water supply before removing the filter. If you installed the shut-off valve as suggested in the installation steps above (Step 3), you need to turn the valve off and allow the water to drain through the system.

Remove the housing by unscrewing it from the mount. Pull the old filter cartridge out and insert the new one. Screwing the cartridge back in place, you are done once you turn the water supply back on.

The filter change should be completed, on average, every three to six months. Double-check with your owner’s manual to determine the style type and frequency of a filter change.


Cleaning & Maintenance

For the most part, a whole house water filter system is maintenance-free. Except for replacing the filters as explained above, there isn’t much you need to do. Unlike a POU or reverse osmosis system, you don’t have sediment to repack or carbon to replace. Each filter cartridge will last until time to replace, making your maintenance minimal.

However, you do need to inspect your system regularly. Any time that your water changes, you should inspect your entire system. If the taste, odor, or appearance is different than what you are used to, check all fittings, seals, and filters, replacing as needed.

Don't forget to use your ears as well. If your system is making weird or new noises, it is time for a detailed inspection. Even if there are no changes to your water or audible signs that something is wrong, you should still maintain an annual inspection regimen. Locating potential problems and addressing them as soon as they are spotted will save you money and frustration down the road.


Frequently Asked Questions

Let’s answer some of the more commonly asked questions about the filter systems and their components.

Do whole house water filters reduce water pressure?

Because of where they are located, most water filters will not reduce the water pressure by noticeable amounts. However, with that being said, the higher the filtration level, the less water will get through quickly. Sub-micron filters are not recommended for whole-house systems. These only have an output of about 1 gallon per minute. While this pressure may be fine for cooking or cleaning, it isn’t enough pressure for baths or showers.

What is the average cost of a whole house water filtration system?

The average cost for a basic, cost-efficient system is about $400. For a top-end system, though, you can pay about $1,800 on average.

How much does it cost to install a whole house filtration system?

Setting up a whole house water treatment system can vary significantly in price. A lot will depend on if you pay for professional installation or take it on as a DIY project. The national average for installation is between $832 and $2,726, according to Home Advisor.

How do I know if I need a whole house water filter?

The obvious answer is to tell you that you need a whole house water filter system if there are issues with your water, such as discoloration, odor, or taste. The best way to tell is to test your water to find out what contaminants are found in your water. A whole house filter will help hard water, reduce odors, and can improve the taste of water. However, if you are looking for more pure drinking water, you might be able to get by with just a POU filter or reverse osmosis under-sink filter. These systems work well alongside a whole-house filter, though, so you might consider getting both types.

What should I do with the used filters?

Many vendors and manufacturers offer a recycling program for used filter cartridges. If yours does not, you can check the markings on the plastic shell. If your region recycles the type of plastic the cartridges are made from, you can recycle them with your local recycling service.

Can I drink the water filtered with a whole house filtration system?

A whole house water filter system is safe to drink. While Reverse Osmosis water filter systems are the only current method to get truly safe tap water for drinking, the whole house filter will be a marked improvement over unfiltered tap water form your local water supply.

What are the reasons why hard water occurs, and what are the dangers of it?

Hard water occurs when there is a large amount of dissolved minerals. Calcium, magnesium, and other particles can lower the performance of soaps and shampoos and alter the taste of drinking water. It is possible, though still being studied that drinking hard water can have adverse cardiovascular effects.

Which is best for disinfecting water, UV purification, or chlorination?

Both methods are effective at disinfecting water. However, the UV purification only requires a light bulb and doesn’t produce any harmful byproducts that chlorination can produce. While they may be equal at the disinfection, UV purification is safer.


Conclusion

As you can see, there are a lot of options when it comes to your whole house water filtration needs. It is advised that you purchase a water testing kit before you purchase so you know exactly what needs to be filtered from your water.

We highly recommend the Aquasana EQ-1000 system for your whole house filter needs. Not only is the system easy to maintain and install, but it will filter out almost everything your water contains. There is a system designed for all water supply options, including city water, well water, and backwoods water. It is the best option all around.

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