Informational Guide

How To Remove Calcium Buildup On Faucets

When calcium deposits build on your faucet, it can make them look old and worn. Here’s 3 ways to remove calcium buildups from faucets easily.

by Ian Haynes

When calcium deposits begin to build on the outside of your faucet, it can make any sleek and sophisticated kitchen look old and worn.

Getting rid of these deposits does not need to be frustrating; read on to discover how to remove calcium and hard water deposits from faucets.

Calcium build-up is due to the minerals and calcium salts gathered in the water during its journey to your home building up over time. As water makes its journey from rain to tap water, it soaks through the soil and rivers until it is processed and sent to your home.

These minerals and deposits catch on the internal plumbing and the faucet aerator, as well as other parts of your plumbing. Calcium build-up on faucets is a natural process but not the best-looking one. However, it is easy enough to remove once you know how.

Calcium Buildup On Faucet

Bad Effects Of Calcium Build Up On Your Fixtures And Plumbing

There are no serious effects from drinking or using hard water regularly. In terms of physical conditions, especially hard water can aggravate eczema or other skin conditions. In terms of your home, hard water can react with your soaps and detergents to create soap scum, spotty marks on dishes, and rust stains.

The minerals and deposits in hard water can also reduce your dishwasher and washing machines. As limescale builds up in your pipes, it can increase detergent residue on your clothes and washing up, and reduce water pressure and flow. If left untreated, hard water can lead to pipe corrosion, which can be expensive and time-consuming to deal with.


3 Ways To Eliminate Calcium Build Up On Faucets

Removing with Chemicals

Materials:

  • PVC/neoprene gloves
  • Protective clothing and gloves
  • Sponge/toothbrush
  • Plastic bag
  • Rubber bands
  • Cloths/rags
  • Pliers
  • CLR cleaner, phosphoric acid cleaner, all-purpose cleaner

Steps:

  1. 1
    Put on your protective gear.
  2. 2
    Air out the space.
  3. 3
    Remove the aerator by twisting counterclockwise. You may need to wrap your pliers in cloth to turn if it’s stiff to avoid scratching the finish
  4. 4
    Please keep track of each of the pieces and the order that they appear
  5. 5
    Soak the pieces in your chemical of choice, following the label carefully regarding dilution, amount, and soaking time.
  6. 6
    Fix a plastic bag of the same solution to your faucet opening with rubber bands, ensuring that the solution will not damage the faucet’s finish.
  7. 7
    Once the soaking time is done, scrub the pieces and faucet opening gently with a toothbrush or sponge and rinse thoroughly.
  8. 8
    Reconnect the pieces in the correct order to the fixture.

Removing with Lime

Materials:

  • Lime or lemon wedges
  • Gloves and goggles
  • Toothbrush, cloth, or sponge
  • A small bowl or plastic bag
  • Rubber bands
  • Pliers
  • Clean cloth and toothbrush

Steps:

  1. 1
    Put your gloves and goggles on and air out the room.
  2. 2
    Wipe the lemon or lime wedge over the affected areas and leave for a few minutes. This works best for copper, chrome, and brass fixtures.
  3. 3
    Remove the aerator by twisting counterclockwise, wrapping pliers in a clean cloth to help if necessary.
  4. 4
    Soak parts and opening for a few minutes as above.
  5. 5
    Once done, scrub if necessary and rinse.
  6. 6
    Wipe the fixtures dry.
  7. 7
    Test to ensure that the water pressure has improved and that the build-up has been removed.
  8. 8
    Repeat the process if necessary.

Removing With Vinegar

Materials:

  • White vinegar
  • Gloves and goggles
  • Pliers
  • Clean cloths, toothbrush, and sponges
  • Plastic bag
  • Small bowl
  • Rubber bands

Steps:

  1. 1
    Put on your protective gear and ventilate the space.
  2. 2
    Remove the aerator as above, wrapping the pliers in a cloth to loosen if necessary.
  3. 3
    Remove the necessary internal parts, putting them in order of appearance to ensure reassembly is easy.
  4. 4
    Dilute the vinegar with water 1:1 and put some in a plastic bag and small bowl. Put the parts in the bowl and attached the bag to the faucet opening with rubber bands.
  5. 5
    Leave for half an hour to soak.
  6. 6
    Remove and rinse parts thoroughly, scrubbing with a sponge or toothbrush if necessary.
  7. 7
    Reassemble the aerator parts.
  8. 8
    Test to ensure everything works.
  9. 9
    Repeat if necessary.

How To Prevent Calcium Build Up On Faucets

Now that your faucets are clean, you need to know how to prevent calcium build-up on taps in the future. The two most effective ways to do that are to install a water filtration system and water softener system.

These will require a professional’s help to install effectively. Installing these systems will help you tackle the hard water directly to decrease the chances of a build-up happening in the future.

With regular cleaning and maintenance, you can ensure that those systems keep your plumbing in top condition for years to come. We recommend treating your faucets with the steps above every couple of months to keep them in top condition.

How To Remove Calcium Deposits From Faucet

People also Ask (FAQs)

What color is calcium build-up?

Calcium build-up typically looks like a white or grey powdery substance that often crumbles to the touch. The color difference depends on the types of minerals and calcium deposits in your area.

Does WD 40 remove calcium deposits?

WD-40 can remove calcium deposits from your faucets. Soak the parts as above in WD-40 for a few minutes before scrubbing and rinsing them. This method works best for toilets affected by limescale build-up.

Does Coke remove limescale?

Surprisingly, coke can remove limescale. Take apart your faucets as above and soak them in a bowl of coke for a few minutes before scrubbing and rinsing them thoroughly and reassembling.


Conclusion

Knowing how to clean calcium deposits from kitchen faucets is easy when you know how. You will find the best way to remove calcium deposits from kitchen faucets by testing various methods and seeing which works for you.

Ian Haynes is an expert writer who has successfully deployed over 500 plumbing pages and other related content. He has an excellent understanding of home plumbing issues and translates his experiences via Plumbing Lab so readers can have a better understanding of common household problems. Outside of his work, Ian likes exploring Brooklyn with his Labrador.

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