Tips & Tricks

Best Sump Pumps: Reviewed, Rated & Compared

We have reviewed thermoplastic, cast iron, submersible and pedestal pumps for all water needs.

by PlumberAndy

Tips & Tricks

Best Sump Pumps: Reviewed, Rated & Compared

We have reviewed thermoplastic, cast iron, submersible and pedestal pumps for all water needs.

by PlumberAndy

by PlumberAndy

If you have a home in a flood zone, with a foundation under the water line or with a basement or crawl space, you probably have a sump pump. If you don’t have a sump pump, you should think about getting one.

Sump pumps are electrical pumps that remove water and moisture before it can flood or puddle in your basement. There are two main types of sump pumps and many benefits to owning one.

This article will cover everything you need to know about sump pumps, their installation, and maintenance and we will include the 9 best sump pumps, reviewed, rated and compared.

How Sump Pumps Work and Who Needs One?

If you wonder how a sump pump works, look no further. In the most basic sense, a sump pump uses a float much like the ballcock in your toilet. When the float is raised, (meaning water has lifted it), the pump turns on.

The pump pulls the water in through a filtered sump pump basin, and out through a pipe (usually PVC) that is diverted downhill and away from your home.

Sump pump installation can be a DIY project if you have the tools and know-how. It is recommended, though, that you budget the cost of professional installation into your sump pump cost if you don’t know how to install a sump pump.

If you have a basement or crawl space that doesn’t stay dry year round, you need a sump pump. Even if your bottom floors don’t flood, the moisture build-up can still lead to mold, mildew and broken foundations. The best-rated sump pumps will keep your basement dry at all times.


Advantages of Having Sump Pump In Your Home

As we mentioned before, there are several reasons to own a sump pump. If you follow our sump pump reviews, you will find that the best sump pump brands will provide you with years of reliable use and meet most or all of the benefits listed below.

  • Extra flood insurance
    A sump pump helps remove flood water as it enters the home, saving your property and time.
  • Financially economical
    Even with professional installation costs, a sump pump will more than pay for itself the first time it has to kick on.
  • Battery Backup
    You can purchase a sump pump with battery backup so even in the event of a power outage your basement sump pump will continue to run.
  • Low maintenance
    Submersible sump pumps and crawl space sump pumps are low maintenance items. Regular checks for debris blockages and drain pipe flow is about all you have to do.
  • Multiple applications
    You don’t have to stick with just crawl spaces and basements. You can use a sump pump for pool draining, keeping underground water leaks dry while doing repairs and any other application you can think of where water needs to be moved quickly.

Considerations When Purchasing a Sump Pump

With so many options to choose from, there are a lot of small considerations to think about before plopping your money down on a sump pump. Below are the most significant factors to consider when making your purchase.

Type of Sump Pump

The two main types of pumps are the submersible sump pump and the pedestal sump pump. The result is the same; water is removed from the area before it can flood the basement or crawl space.

A submersible pump is placed in a sump pump basin below the level of the foundation. Generally, you will break the concrete and dig a hole for the pump to sit in.

A pedestal sump pump, on the other hand, is above the surface or foundation and will sit atop a pedestal, or stand. These pumps are generally louder since the motor isn’t buffered by the earth. However, they tend to last 5 to 10 years longer (up to 20 years versus up to 15 years for the submersible pumps) on average.

Durability

Another thing to think about is the construction material of your pumps. While you can find a sump pump made from virtually any material, the three most common are thermoplastic, cast iron, and stainless steel.

Thermoplastic is a high-heat plastic (think PVC piping) that is easily moldable when heated and then hardens like a rock when the material cools. When used for sump pumps, the casings, mounts, pedestals, and other parts will be made from the thermoplastics, and the motors will still be manufactured from metal, alloys or aluminum.

The cost-effectiveness of plastic makes pumps made from them a little less expensive but at the cost of durability over the metal and iron counterparts.

Cast iron was one of the first materials used for sump pumps because of its extreme durability. However, because of the weight, you won’t find very many pedestal sump pumps made from cast iron.

Cast iron will have the longest life expectancy because of the durability of the iron. However, you will have to do more maintenance on these sump pumps to keep them from corroding, rusting, or breaking down.

Stainless steel, on the other hand, is harder than thermoplastic and lighter than cast iron. You will find both styles of sump pumps made from stainless steel, which comes with a much lower maintenance routine than cast iron.

Capacity

When looking at the ratings of your chosen sump pump, you will notice two readings. The first is Gallons per Hour (or GPH). This is the measure of how much water the pump can cycle in a minute, measured in gallons.

A higher GPH doesn’t always mean a better pump, though. Higher GPH uses larger motors, more electricity to operate and can burn out if there isn’t enough water to cycle.

The other rating is known as "Head," or the Head Rating, which is the measure of length or height of discharge. Both numbers together will give you the overall flow rate of the pump. You will want to find the right pump that offers you enough GPH to keep your area dry while having a large enough head rating to move the water away from the home.

The average head rating is about 10 feet. Combine that with your GPH and you will know how powerful your sump pump is.

Power Source

The primary power source for all sump pumps will be electricity. When installing the sump pump, you will want to connect the power supply to a GFCI outlet to prevent electric shocks, fires, or electrocution.

Some pumps will have a built-in backup battery or be able to be fitted with one. The battery backup is just that; a secondary means of temporary power. In the event there is a storm causing the water table to rise, and the power goes out, the battery will run the pump until power is restored (or the battery runs out of charge.).

Switching System

One of the most underrated and overlooked factors when buying a sump pump is the switching system. There are automatic systems and manual systems. Choosing the right one for your needs can be crucial.

Automatic systems will use a float to engage the motor. As the water pushes the float upwards, the motor will kick on. It works similarly to the float in your toilet tank (only opposite) which allows water to fill the tank until the float is fully raised.

Automatic systems are ideal for homes that have a submersible pump installed and don't want to have to constantly check if the basement is already flooded to turn it on. If your pump is in a crawl space, or a hard to access area, you may want to consider an automatic system.

On the other hand, the power draw and constant hum of a pump in operation may become too much for some people. In these cases, a manual switch can be used. Instead of a float, the motor will be connected to a toggle switch, powered through a light switch or even a two-position push button.

When there is a need for the sump pump to run, you will have to flip the switch manually. It will save energy (though not a noticeable amount, unless your pump runs constantly), and it will cut down on the “false-alarm” time when the water table rises and falls quickly without the need for the pump to run.

Horsepower

Deciding on how powerful your sump pump motor should be isn’t that difficult of a task. You need to take two measurements to find your ideal horsepower (HP). The first measurement is how high the pump will need to push the water.

For a submersible pump, you will need to calculate form the bottom of your sump pit to the top of the drain pipe leading out of the house.

The second measurement is to determine how far the pump will push the water. This is measured from the pump outlet line to the end of your drain pipe. Generally, this is default to 10 feet, but yours will vary depending on the location and mounting of the pump.

There are three main sizes of pump motors when it comes to sump pumps, 1/3 HP, ½ HP and 1 HP. If your height is less than 6 feet and the distance is 8 feet or less, you will only need a 1/3 HP motor.

Anything between 8 and 15 feet high and 8 feet or more in length will require a ½ HP motor. If you go higher than 15 feet and longer than 9 feet, you may need to utilize a full 1 HP motor to get the job done.

Basin Size

For submersible pumps, the basin, or sump pit will need to accommodate your sump pump, the basin itself and allow enough water to surround the pump, so it doesn’t run dry, but not so much that it floods the pump itself.

Generally, though not always, the basin will be dug two feet below the foundation with a diameter of at least 18 inches. Your specific pump’s manual will outline the ideal basin size. However, you may need to make some adjustments for fitting the basin in the pit and the amount of flood water expected for your area.

Installation & Warranty

Figuring out the cost of sump pump installation is tricky. All of the above factors come into play. You will need to figure out what type of flooring you will be digging into, as concrete will need to be broken up whereas gravel can be shoveled away.

If you are replacing a pump, the installation labor is already done (drainage is in place, the sump pit is already dug, etc.) so the actual labor costs will drop. Likewise, you can save money by making the installation a DIY project.

It is better, in most cases, to have a sump pump professionally installed. The higher cost also allows you to know the job was done correctly, and in the off chance it wasn't, you will be able to get the needed repairs done, so the job is done correctly.

After all the factors are included, HomeAdvisor estimates that proper sump pump installation will cost between $644 and $1,824.

Warranties will vary as well. Submersible pumps will have a shorter life expectancy, ranging from 5 to 15 years. Pedestal pumps, on the other hand, will generally last between 20 and 30 years. The construction materials, installation, and maintenance are done will all factor into the warranty period granted by the manufacturer.

Most warranties will offer a 2 to 5-year coverage on labor, and up to 10 years or more on parts. While each vendor, contractor, and manufacturer will be different, you can expect to find warranties ranging from a few years to lifetime.


9 Best Sump Pumps Reviewed

1. Superior Pump 91570 with 10-Foot Cord

Type

Submersible

Gallons per hour

3300

Motor

½ HP

Material

Thermoplastic

Warranty

Yes 1-year

Dimensions

7 x 7 x 12 inches

Weight

7.8 pounds

Superior Pump is our top pick for the best-rated sump pump. The thermoplastic body helps prevent corrosion from water exposure, chemicals, and other harmful detergents that may end up in the rising water.

The submersible pump comes with a ½ HP motor that will push up to 3,300 GPH with a max head rating of 25 feet. With this combination, you won’t have any problems clearing out your crawl space or basement.

For flushing and cleaning, there is a ¾ inch garden hose connection and a filter screen to help separate large debris. If you are looking for discharge power, the Superior Pump sump pump has a 1 ½ inch discharge to handle large capacity drainage.

Properly mounted and installed, the pump will operate daily without worry for up to 10 full years. The 1-year manufacturer warranty will cover defects in workmanship and quality, but we highly doubt you will need to make a claim.

Pros
  • Huge ½ HP motor to push up to 3,300 GPH.
  • Filter screen separates large debris.
  • Thermoplastic molding prevents corrosion and breakdown due to chemicals and harsh water.
  • Max head rating of 25 feet for longer drain pipes.
Cons
  • No automatic switching system.
  • Can quickly burn out when left connected to the power source.

2. WAYNE CDU980E 

Type

Submersible

Gallons per hour

4600 at 10 feet

Motor

3/4 HP

Material

Cast iron/Stainless steel

Warranty

Yes 5-year

Dimensions

10 x 10 x 14 inches

Weight

20 pounds

The best submersible sump pump is easily the Wayne CDU980E. This ¾ HP powerhouse is stainless steel coated cast iron with a vertical float switch. Once mounted in your sump pit, you won’t have to worry about anything.

The power cord is only 8 feet long, but it is water resistant and won’t break down if submerged for several hours. For those worried about weep holes, none is needed here. The pump utilizes a top suction to eliminate air lock and minimize clogging.

It won’t separate large debris. However, it does use a 1 ½ inch discharge to tie into existing plumbing or use standard plumbing when installing new. You will need at least an 11-inch diameter (or larger) basin for installation.

At the 10-foot head rate, the discharge is over 4600 GPH. You will be able to watch the water level recede once this pump kicks on. 

Pros
  • The quiet operation even when working constantly.
  • ¾ HP motor will push 4600 GPH at 10 head.
  • Includes a 90-day return policy and a 5-year limited warranty for parts and craftsmanship.
  • Installation is well documented and easy for one person to follow.
Cons
  • Heavy unit at 20 pounds. Will need to ensure footing is solid in the sump pit.
  • No made in America (China), just assembled.
  • Cast iron will corrode eventually with constant submersion.

3. Professional EZ Travel Collection

Type

Submersible

Gallons per hour

3700 GHP

Motor

1 1/2HP

Material

Thermoplastic

Warranty

No (available through vendors)

Dimensions

18 x 14 x 12 inches

Weight

12.5 pounds

The best sump pump for pool and spa is arguably the Professional EZ Drain Pump. It comes with everything you need except the power. Once you attach the 25 foot PVC drain hose and drop it in the pool, plug it in and let it go to work.

If pool maintenance is your thing (or your duty), the folding feet for low profile suction will be your best asset. The 25-foot waterproof power cord means you don’t have to worry about electric shock while operating it, either.

The flow rate form the gigantic 1-1/2 HP motor will push up to 3,700 GPH, making it ideal for swimming pools, ponds, spas, hot tubs or even emergency use in a basement.

You won’t find any switches, though as it is either on or off. It isn’t automatic, so permanent installation is not recommended. It does come with a lightweight design and comfortable carrying handle for easy transport, though.

Pros
  • Lightweight design can be carried just about anywhere.
  • Ideal for pools, spas, and ponds.
  • Folding feet allow for more water to be drained from the bottom of the pool.
Cons
  • No manufacturers warranty, though you may be able to purchase a warranty through specific vendors.
  • No power switch, it is on as soon as you plug it in.

4. Flotec FPPM3600D-01/09 

Type

Submersible

Gallons per hour

3000 GHP

Motor

¾ HP

Material

Thermoplastic

Warranty

Yes 1-Year

Dimensions

6 x 6 x 33 inches

Weight

11.5 pounds

The Flotec Pedestal sump pump is a 1/3 HP pump designed for 12-inch basins or broader. A replacement pump, the Flotec can still be used for a new installation. With a vertical float switch, the pump will only operate when it is needed.

The lower HP motor compared to the first three top picks isn’t anything to worry about. You will still get 2450 GPH at the 10-foot head. It also comes with a standard 1-year manufacturers warranty.

The 6-foot power cord may cause you to need an extension, though that is the only thing this pump runs short on. With a 10 ½ inch on switch and a 2 ½ inch off, the vertical float will ensure all of the excess water is gone before shutting down.

The thermoplastic design and pedestal height of 33 inches gives you reliability for up to 20 years. If you are replacing an existing pedestal sump pump, the Flotec will fit most other brands’ mounting. As long as the basin diameter is 12 inches, you won’t even have to make a new hole in your foundation.

The Flotec FPPM3600D is the best pedestal sump pump on the market right now for value and reliability.

Pros
  • Light design with a tall pedestal for longevity and ease of use.
  • The vertical float switch has an 8-inch on-off range.
  • Easily installs new or as a replacement pump in existing mounts.
Cons
  • Smaller 1/3 HP motor has a GPH of less than 2700 at 10-foot head.
  • Doesn’t have a quiet run design and will need to be closeted or shielded.

5. Liberty Pumps 404

Type

Submersible

Gallons per hour

2200 GHP

Motor

¾ HP

Material

Thermoplastic

Warranty

Yes 1-Year

Dimensions

13.75 x 13.75 x 11 inches

Weight

19 pounds

The best-rated sump pump is the Liberty Pumps 404. This compact designed pump has two housings making it possible to clean and inspect or test the float without having to disconnect the plumbing.

Small but mighty, the 404 has a max head of 21 feet and a discharge rate of up to 2200 GPH. Ideal for crawl space applications or where ever you need a drain and don't have a gravity feed system. Bar sinks, laundry rooms, and other low-level drain areas are no match for the Liberty Pumps 404.

Using a 1/3 HP motor, the 404 can push water over 25 feet with a downhill slope. The max head will allow you to run piping from the pump area to a more comfortable exit if needed, and the side mounts threaded discharge ports allow for multiple positioning of the unit.

The 10-foot power cord is not waterproof and will need to be placed above the water level. You should also make sure to plug the grounded three-prong plug into a GFCI to prevent electrical shock.

Pros
  • Simple installation no matter the size or location.
  • Front and side options for inlets.
  • The ultra-quiet operation for multiple purpose installations.
  • 21-foot max head rating.
Cons
  • The power cord isn’t waterproof.
  • Lower GPH rate than other top-rated sump pumps.

6. Zoeller M53 Mighty-mate

Type

Submersible

Gallons per hour

2600 GHP

Motor

¾ HP

Material

Cast iron and Thermoplastic

Warranty

Yes 3-Year

Dimensions

7.8 x 7.8 x 10 inches

Weight

21 pounds

When it comes to the durability of cast iron, not much else can compare. The best-cast iron sump pump right now is the Zoeller Mighty-Mate. Also known as the M53, this 1/3 HP pump has a max head of 20 feet and a GPH rating of up to 2600.

You won’t have to worry about corrosion either; the cast iron body is coated in an epoxy resin to withstand constant water abuse and the base is molded with thermoplastic for extended life.

Installing this mighty sump pump will only take you about half an hour as a replacement pump and depending on the location a full day for a new install.

Completely submersible, the cast iron M53 comes with a 3-year limited warranty that will protect against manufacturers defects or motor issues under regular use and operation.

The maintenance is a little more robust on this machine than on some of the other models on our list. However, once you have done the routine of cleaning the housing and inlets, it will go faster or you.

Pros
  • Cast iron with an epoxy coating for longer life underwater.
  • Heavy duty 1/3 HP motor has a 20-foot head rating.
  • Easily replaces your current sump pump with minimal installation differences.
Cons
  • Can be difficult to position due to the size and weight.
  • The float switch is not adjustable.

7. Liberty Pumps SJ10

Type

Submersible

Gallons per hour

1200 GHP

Motor

1/3 HP

Material

Thermoplastic

Warranty

Yes 3-Year

Dimensions

14.5 x 5 x 21.5 inches

Weight

5 pounds

One thing every sump pump needs is a backup plan. Battery backups are popular, but water powered backup pumps don’t need any power at all. The Liberty Pumps SJ10 is the best water powered backup sump pump you can buy.

Installation should be performed by a licensed plumber to ensure the service water and drain pipes are correctly connected. Once set up is installed, though, you will wonder how you ever lived without it.

Not only will the SJ10 work when the power goes out, but the water power (created by a suction vacuum from a water service line) will work without batteries for as long as you have water service to the home.

The vertical float switch and thermoplastic design both fight off corrosion and chemicals that may end up in the water they are in.

With a 60 psi service line and a 4-foot head, the Liberty Pumps SJ10 will evacuate an additional 1200 GPH over your primary sump pump.

In a pinch, the SJ10 working alone is quiet and efficient, keeping your basement safe from flooding, even when the power goes out. One thing the manual doesn’t cover (and another reason for professional installation) is that you are required to install a backflow valve for proper operation.

Pros
  • Quiet operation at all times.
  • Easily fits in with your existing sump basin.
  • You don’t need to worry about plugs, outlets or recharging batteries, ever.
Cons
  • Will only work as a backup or in conjunction with a primary pump.
  • You will need to install a backflow valve (not covered in the installation manual).

8. WAYNE ESP25 Battery Back-Up

Type

Submersible

Gallons per hour

3300 GHP

Motor

1 HP

Material

Thermoplastic

Warranty

Yes 2-years

Dimensions

7.25 x 5 x 10 inches

Weight

12.9 pounds

If you are looking at a battery backup pump for your primary sump pump, the Wayne ESP25 could be your answer. The best battery backup sump pump currently available. The ESP25 has everything you need, including an alarm.

What is missing is the battery. You will need to purchase that separately, and it is highly recommended that you buy the Wayne WSB1275. This 75-amp battery will last up to 8 hours and comes pre-charged, so you can use it right away if needed.

The ESP25 has a max head of 10 feet where it will pump 3,300 GPH out of your basement. When the battery backup pump kicks on, you will be alerted by the alarm. If the system begins to fail because of the battery running out, the alarm will sound to let you know.

It is a fail-safe system that will work instead of, or in conjunction with, your primary electric sump pump. The Wayne ESP25 has a limited 2-year warranty, and the recommended battery comes with a 1-year warranty.

Pros
  • 3,300 GPH rivals most electric pumps.
  • Easier to install next to an existing system.
  • The included alarm gives you notifications and alerts without monitoring.
  • 10-foot head gives you space and power for almost every emergency condition.
Cons
  • A battery must be purchased separately.
  • The float can be challenging to access for cleaning and maintenance.

9. Wayne WSS30V 

Type

Submersible

Gallons per hour

3700 GHP

Motor

1 1/2HP - 12-volt

Material

Thermoplastic

Warranty

Yes 2-years Primary 1-year battery

Dimensions

18 x 14 x 12 inches

Weight

12.5 pounds

When finished basements need protecting you want the best sump pump for basements. Crawl spaces and pool pumps aren’t going to cut it. The Wayne WSS30V is your answer.

This combination sump pump is a ½ HP primary pump and a 12-volt battery back up unit in one. You can’t go wrong with this purchase. The primary motor runs on a standard 3-prong outlet with a 10 foot grounded plug.

You will get a max head rating of 22 feet and easily reach 3500 GPH at 10 feet. The battery pump will maintain these numbers with only a slight drop off after 10 feet (3480 vs. 3500). The battery is designed to run for up to 8 hours in the event of a power outage.

The complete unit is tested, shipped ready to drop in and is plug and go capable with minor adjustments needed. If you are replacing your old or worn out a sump pump, upgrading to the combination model will be a money (and basement), saver.

Pros
  • Combination unit for an all-in-one emergency sump pump solution.
  • Quiet, quick operation pushes 3700 GPH.
  • Thermoplastic design for years of corrosion-free use.
Cons
  • May require a larger basin that what you are currently using.
  • Primary and battery floats are separate, requiring more water to activate the backup float.

Types of Sump Pumps

Besides the submersible and pedestal pumps we have covered in this sump pump review, there are a few other types of sump pumps that have varying uses.

Traditional and Sewage Sump Pumps

Classic sump pumps, like those covered above, are not the same as sewage sump pumps. A sewage pump is specially designed to remove water, waste and vent gases from basements and basement bathrooms. They are connected directly to your sewer lines and not expelled directly outside like a traditional pump.

Electric and Battery Backup Sump Pumps

Electric sump pumps are primary pumps and work almost daily to keep the water table from entering your home. Battery back-up sump pumps is a sump pump backup system. Much like the water-powered options, the sump pump battery runs the pump in the event of a power outage.

If you go with a battery back up pump, you should ensure you get the pump, the battery, mounting hardware (which may include a battery box), float, pump controller and battery recharger.

Water Powered

A water powered sump pump is used as a secondary or backup pump. It is generally installed in the same basin pit as your regular pump but will have a dedicated supply line to it. Water pumps work without electricity or batteries, making them excellent backup pumps.


How to Use a Sump Pump?

Using a sump pump isn’t an active thing. The pump works when the float rises and shuts off when it is down. You don’t have to do anything to use the sump pump in any manner. The sole exception is when you have a manually powered pump and you need to flip the power switch.

There are some tips to keep in mind when operating your pump, though. You need to test the pump actually works regularly, and keep the basin pit clean of debris. General and routine pump maintenance, cleaning and testing should be a monthly activity for you.

For more ideas about your sump pump and its operation, check out this video.


Installation, Storage and Maintenance

If you decide to make this a DIY project, you should understand that installing a submersible sump pump is an all-day task, possibly extending to two days. Make sure you plan ahead and have enough room for your work.

The storage area for the sump pump isn't very much, but you should ensure that the pump rests flat in the basin, using a slab on top of the gravel. You will also want to make sure there is a proper fitting top to help prevent debris from falling in and potentially clogging the pump.

Routine maintenance will include cleaning out the sump pit, wiping down the pump itself and checking the drainage lines for clogs.

For more information on the install process, check out this video.


Frequently Asked Questions

Now we will answer some of the more common questions about sump pumps and their use.

How long do sump pumps last?

The longevity of your new sump pump is determined by the type, your maintenance routine, and how much it is used. A submersible pump should last between 10 and 15 years. A pedestal sump pump will double that time, lasting on average 20 to 30 years.

How long will a sump pump run on battery?

 A battery back-up should run the pump easily for two to three hours. Once the battery dies, you will have to recharge it using electricity, though. If your power isn't back on when the battery finally dies, you will have to wait until power is restored to the primary pump to continue the evacuation of water.

How deep should a sump pump discharge line be?

You will want to keep the discharge as far from the foundation of the home as possible. In general circumstances, the distance is about 10 feet. However, this can be shorter or longer, depending on where the ground starts to slope away from the house.

Do I need a plumber to set up a sump pump?

You do not need a plumber to set up or install a sump pump. However, before you begin the work yourself, you need to check with your city ordinances and make sure you have the proper permits (if required) and know where you are digging.

What should I do if my sump pump burns out?

If a sump pump burns out, there isn’t much you can do. The electrical motor has gone bad and it is actually cheaper to replace the pump than to try and repair the motor. However, when you do get a motor burn out, you should determine why it happened. If it was because the pump was working too hard, for example, your next pump should be a larger model.

What accessories do I need together with my sump pump?

You will need to have the basin for submersible pumps, as well as filter paper to surround the basin tub. Also, you will need the pump itself, of course, as well as a back-up or battery backup unit. You will also need the proper drain line and if you want the added protection investing in a sump pump alarm will help you know right when the pump fails.


Conclusion

Buying a sump pump isn’t a difficult task. Buying the right one, however, can be. After you determine the style you want, you still need to figure out what size motor and how far the drainage lines need to go. Not to mention, where it will be installed and who will do the installation.

Hopefully, this sump pump review has helped you find the right model for your home and specific needs. The Superior Pump 91570 is our top pick and if you can’t decide, you should look closer at this model.

The thermoplastic body prevents corrosion and keeps the overall cost down. With a 3300 GPH flow rate and a max head of 25 feet, the Superior Pump sump pump is one of the best currently available on the market.

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